“Dead Horse Bay” and “Archives of Winter” in Poetics for the More-than-Human World Anthology

“Dead Horse Bay” and “Archives of Winter,” poems from my current ongoing project, Postrock, have been reprinted in Poetics for the More-than-Human World: An Anthology of Poetry and Commentary, edited by Mary Newell, Bernard Quetchenbach, and Sarah Nolan and published by Spuyten Duyvil.

The anthology was originally published online as a special issue of Dispatches from the Poetry Wars“Poetics for the More-than-Human World: An Anthology of Poetry and Commentary.” Other contributors include Rae ArmantroutRachel Blau DuPlessisJane HirshfieldCynthia HogueAngela HumeMichael McClureJohn ShoptawStephanie StricklandHarriet TarloEdwin Torres, and many, many others.

Reading of “Dead Horse Bay” and “Blason III” for the Ecopoetics Reading, July 16, 2020

On July 16, 2020, I took part in the fourth of ten readings around the release of the Poetics for the More-than-Human World: An Anthology of Poetry and Commentary (Spuyten Duyvil, forthcoming 2020), originally published as a special issue of Dispatches from the Poetry Wars edited by Mary Newell, Bernard Quetchenbach, and Sarah Nolan. Other readers are: Cara Chamberlain, Petra Kuppers, Andrew Melrose, Eléna Rivera, Arthur Sze, and Jen Web. My reading of “Dead Horse Bay” and “Blason III” starts around 29:30 in the July 16 reading .

To find more about the series, visit the Ecopoetics Anthology Facebook page.

Poetics for the More-than-Human World Readings

To accompany the online publication of “Poetics for the More-than-Human World: An Anthology of Poetry and Commentary” at Dispatches for the Poetry Wars, along with its eventual print publication by Spuyten Duyvil, the editors have organized a series of ten readings over the next few months. The first reading kicks off next week, June 25, 2020 at 4:00 p.m. EDT with Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Patricio Ferrari, Peter O’Leary, Stephanie Strickland, Harriet Tarlo, Orchid Tierney, and Edwin Torres.

On July 16, 2020 at 4:00 pm EDT I’ll be reading with Cara Chamberlain, Petra Kuppers, Jake Levine, Eléna Rivera, Arthur Sze, and Jen Web.

Find our more on the anthology’s Facebook and Eventbrite pages.

End of the Semester Links, Fall 2018

Nuclear and Environmental

Fourth National Climate Assessment.

Deconstructed, “Will the US Ever Give Up Its Nukes?”

“Trump Says US Will Withdraw from Nuclear Deal with Russia.”

Wilfred Wan, “The Nuclear Threat Is Rising: Europe Cannot Just Stand and Watch.”

Will Steffen, et al, “Trajectories of the Earth System in the Anthropocene.”

Kate Aronoff, “‘Hothouse Earth’ Co-Author: The Problem Is Neoliberal Economics” and “With a Green New Deal, Here’s What the World Could Look Like for the Next Generation.”

Kim Stanley Robinson, “To Slow Down Climate Change, We Need to Take On Capitalism.”

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Abstract: Apoclaypse on Repeat: William Carlos Williams’s Spring and All and the Nuclear Imagination

Below is an abstract for a paper I will be presenting at the 2014 American Literature Association Conference, taking place May 22-25. I will be presenting this paper on a panel organized by the William Carlos Williams society, titled, “William Carlos Williams: The Poet-Doctor as Environmentalist.” The panel will be taking place 11:10-12:30 on May 23.

Apocalypse on Repeat: William Carlos Williams’s Spring and All and the Nuclear Imagination

Long out of print after their initial publication in 1923, the prose sections of Spring and All offer remarkable critical avenues for discussing William Carlos Williams’s environmentalism. Serving as both a frame for some of his more well-known poetry and a theoretical engagement with the volume’s central concern—the imagination—the prose of Spring and All cannot help but strike a contemporary reader with its anticipation of the post-apocalyptic and eco-disaster narratives of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. To begin the aesthetic work of poetic composition, Spring and All enacts total destruction followed by material repetition in order to allow Williams to formulate an imagination distinct from a romantic apocalyptic, a formulation essential for the development of his ecopoetics. The imagination in Spring and All is a material force. It is vibrant, organic, and radioactive. It is scientific and geological, and it is concerned with atomic physics well before the atom was split. This paper will argue that Spring and All articulates what I have called elsewhere a nuclear imagination. Drawing upon current reconsiderations of modernism’s relationship to atomic technology and my own conversations with J. Hillis Miller about Williams’s poetry and romanticism, I will suggest that Williams, through embracing this destructive, recursive, ironic, nuclear imagination, abandons an eschatology that could in any way be positive, even as something to be gone “beyond.” In this way, reconsidering Spring and All opens up a space for the contemporary environmental imagination that is neither apocalyptic nor post-apocalyptic, but rather thoroughly material and ecological.