Links in the Time of Coronavirus, Vol. 20: October 16–November 15, 2021

Nuclear and Environmental (and Apocalyptic)

Alex Traub, “Sunao Tsuboi, 96, Dies; Hiroshima Victim Who Lived to Tell His Story.”

Abigail Curtis, “Every Year, They Hike to Remember the Day the Rapture Didn’t Happen.”


Coronavirus

Shane O’Neill, “Is It Just Us or Does Everyone Have a Cold Right Now?”


Politics and National Security State

Jim Tankersley, “Biden Signs Infrastructure Bill, Promoting Benefits for Americans.”

Carol Rosenberg, “US Military Jury Condemns Terrorist’s Torture and Urges Clemency.”

Dave Philipps and Eric Schmitt, “How the US Hid an Airstrike That Killed Dozens of Civilians in Syria.”

Katie Benner, “Steve Bannon Turns Himself in on Contempt of Congress Charges.”


Hyperarchival

Ian Bogost, “The Metaverse Is Bad.”

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Links in the Time of Coronavirus, Vol. 19: September 16–October 15, 2021

Nuclear and Environmental

Min Hyoung Song, Climate Lyricism.


Coronavirus

Cary Funk and John Gramlich, “Ten Facts about Americans and Coronavirus Vaccines.”

Apoorva Mandavilli, “If You’ve Had COVID, Do You Need the Vaccine?”

Zeynep Tufekci, “The Unvaccinated May Not Be Who You Think.”


Politics and Economics

International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, “Pandora Papers.”

David Pegg and Dominic Rushe, “Pandora Papers Reveal South Dakota’s Role as $367bn Tax Haven.”

Raychel Gadson, “‘There’s No There There’: Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor on the Future of the Left.”

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Links in the Time of Coronavirus, Vol. 18: August 16–September 15, 2021

This past fall semester I was teaching three classes and, it seems that whenever I do that, I don’t have time for other things, so the links have fallen away. I will post the backlog over the next few days and hope to be back and current by the fifteenth of December.

 

Nuclear and Environmental

Jessica Hurley and Jeffrey Insko, “Introduction: The Infrastructure of Emergency” and ed. “The Infrastructure of Emergency,” special issue, American Literature.

Heather Murphy, “Will These Places Survive a Collapse? Don’t Bet on It, Skeptics Say.”

Christian Wessels, “The Garbage of Our Time.”

Dorothy Wickenden, “Kim Stanley Robinson on ‘Utopian’ Science Fiction.”


Coronavirus

New York Times, “COVID Updates: Biden Receives Preliminary Report on Virus Origin.”

Juliette Kayyem, “Vaccine Refusers Don’t Get to Dictate Terms Anymore.”

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The Visiting Writers Series at Hartwick College, Fall 2021

This fall, Hartwick College and the Department of English will present the first two readings of the 2021-22 Visiting Writers Series.  All readings take place at 7 p.m. in Eaton Lounge, Bresee Hall at Hartwick College in Oneonta, New York.

Admission to the readings is free and the events are open to the public. Attendees and all campus visitors must be vaccinated for COVID-19 and will be required to provide either their vaccination card or the New York State Excelsior Pass. Any visitor requiring an exception to this requirement must complete this form and receive prior approval from the College. Masks are required in all College buildings.


Roger W. Hecht will read on Wednesday, October 13, 2021.

Su Cho will read on Wednesday, November 10, 2021.

For more information, visit the Visiting Writers Series webpage.

Promotion and Tenure at Hartwick College

Today, I was officially promoted to associate professor of English with tenure at Hartwick College.

This is the result of many years of hard work, but to a large degree, I owe this success to decades of support from friends, family, teachers, mentors, and colleagues. The people I would like to thank are too numerous to name individually, and I fear I would leave someone out if I attempted doing so, as so many have done so many things to help me achieve this lifelong goal.[1] But I would like to thank, first of all, my wonderful students and current and former colleagues in and out of the Department of English at Hartwick College, all those who took the time out of their day to visit my classes, all those who wrote letters of support, including my external reviewers and students, and all those who talked with me about the process, providing crucial advice. I would also like to thank my colleagues up the road at SUNY Oneonta, my amazing students, teachers, mentors, fellow graduate students, and other colleagues at the University of Pittsburgh, and my students and colleagues at Carnegie Mellon University. Thanks to all the anonymous reviewers over the years, the sometimes unseen/unheard but not unacknowledged people who have suggested my name for peer review or to contribute to a journal, and the many editors and publishers who have supported my work, with particular gratitude going to the editors and publishers of boundary 2, Blue Sketch Press, and Salò Press. And I have the deepest abiding gratitude and appreciation for my family and their endless patience listening to me talk about the job market and the tenure process. Most importantly, my partner and spouse: Racheal, I simply could not have done this without everything you bring to our family’s life and your oh-so-keen eye for errata. Your support has meant everything. And if I have somehow overlooked you amongst those mentioned above: thank you thank you thank you.

Thank you.


[1] For some of these individual thanks, see the acknowledgment pages of my dissertation, “The Apocalypse Archive: American Literature and the Nuclear Bomb” (2013), of my two books of poetry, The Rocking Chair (2015) and The Shape of Things (2017), in various articles (here, here, here, and elsewhere too) and interviews (also here), and in works in process and to come.