Guest Appearance on The Jabsteps: Review of LeBron, Inc., by Brian Windhorst

I made another appearance on The Jabsteps podcast filling in for Salvatore Pane in episode 116: “The Review of LeBron, Inc. with Dr. Bradley J. Fest.” Geoff Peck and I talk about Brian Windhorst’s new book, LeBron, Inc.: The Making of a Billion-Dollar Athlete (New York: Grand Central, 2019). For our previous review of  Brian Windhorst and and Dave McMenamin’s book, Return of the King (2017), check out episode 57, Jabsteps Book Review with Dr. Brad Fest! Return of the King (LeBron not Tolkien).”

“Blason I,” “Blason II,” and “Blason III” in Queen Mob’s Teahouse

Honored to have the poems “Blason I,” “Blason II,” and “Blason III” in Queen Mob’s Teahouse. These are the first published poems from a brand new project endeavoring to see everyday objects anew by mediating their perception through lenses of poetic and cultural influence. (Former students may recognize in these my own answers to a question I sometimes pose on the first day of class.)

Summer 2019 Links

I had the privilege of meeting Richard Siken when I was quite young–an undergraduate at the University of Arizona–and he gave me lots of good advice on the poetry world (and life), conversations I still cherish. Please help him out.

Stroke Recovery Fund for Poet Richard Siken.

 

Nuclear and Environmental

Alenka Zupančič, “The Apocalypse Is (Still) Disappointing.”

James Livingston, “Time, Dread, Apocalypse Now.

Ted Nordhaus, “The Empty Radicalism of the Climate Apocalypse.”

Jessica Hurley and Dan Sinykin, eds., Apocalypse, special issue of ASAP/Journal.

Frame, Apocalypse.

Brad Plumer, “Humans Are Speeding Extinction and Altering the Natural World at an ‘Unprecedented’ Pace.”

Damian Carrington, “Why The Guardian Is Changing the Language It Uses about the Environment.”

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The Visiting Writers Series at Hartwick College, Fall 2019

This fall, Hartwick College and the Department of English will present the first four readings of the 2019-20 Visiting Writers Series.  All readings take place at 7 p.m. in Eaton Lounge, Bresee Hall at Hartwick College in Oneonta, New York. Admission is free of charge and the public is invited.


New Hartwick faculty member, assistant professor of English Tessa Yang, will read on Wednesday, October 2, 2019.

George Hovis will read on Wednesday, October 16, 2019.

Lauren Russell will read on Thursday, November 7, 2019.

And Alice Lichtenstein will read from her forthcoming novel, The Crime of Being, on Wednesday, November 20, 2019.

For more information, visit the Visiting Writers Series webpage.

2019-20 Winifred D. Wandersee Scholar in Residence at Hartwick College

I am thrilled and honored to announced that I have been named one of the 2019-20 Winifred D. Wandersee Scholars in Residence at Hartwick College. This award and program will support continued work on my current book project, Too Big to Read: The Megatext in the Twenty-First Century.

For a glimpse into this work in progress, see my essay, “Toward a Theory of the Megatext: Speculative Criticism and Richard Grossman’s ‘Breeze Avenue Working Paper.'”

“Writing Briefly about Really Big Things” in Joseph A. Dane’s Begging the Question

I have a collaborative essay, “Coda: Writing Briefly about Really Big Things,” in Joseph A. Dane‘s new book, Begging the Question: Critical Reasoning in Chaucer Studies, Book History, and Humanistic Inquiry (Mythodologies II) (Marymount Institute Press, 2019). Though brief, it speaks to some of the ongoing concerns in my megatext project, particularly how to situate the project in the field and in conversation with others. My thanks to Dane for inviting me to collaborate with him on this and including my piece in his book.