February 2018 Links

Nuclear and Environmental

Tim Fernholz, “US Nuclear Tests Killed Far More Civilians than We Knew.”

Democracy Now, “Daniel Ellsberg Reveals He Was a Nuclear War Planner, Warns of Nuclear Winter and Global Starvation.”

Daniel Bessner, “On the Brink.”

Alastair Tancred, “A Nuclear First Strike of North Korea Is ‘Tempting’, Says Legendary US Diplomat Henry Kissinger as Kim Jong-un Warns Trump Is Pushing Toward War.”

“Senator Markey Blasts Trump Administration’s Reckless Nuclear Posture Review.”

Helena Feder, “The Realism of Our Time: Interview with Kim Stanley Robinson.”

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February Links

It’s that time of year when I’m busy busy with all sorts of things. Combined with the miserable weather (it got down to -11° Fahrenheit in Pittsburgh last night), some links have been piling up.

 

Environment, Science, International, Disaster

Rebecca Solnit, “The Age of Capitalism Is Over.”

Noam Chomsky, “The World of Our Grandchildren.”

Graeme Wood, “What ISIS Really Wants.”

Raymond T. Pierrehumbert, “Climate Hacking Is Barking Mad.”

Sam Kriss, “Manifesto of the Committee to Abolish Outer Space.”

Cari Romm, “How Three People Can Make a Baby.”

Alan Taylor, “What Record-Breaking Snow Really Looks Like.”

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July Links

(It’s been a few weeks since I’ve posted links, so some of this is already pretty dated, but heck . . it’s also been a jam-packed couple of weeks in the news.)

 

Nuclear

Nina Strochlic, “Britain’s Nuke-Proof Underground City.”

Forthcoming book: Fabienne Colignon’s Rocket States: Atomic Weaponry and the Cultural Imagination.

 

Environment

Lindsay Abrams, “The Ocean Is Covered in a Lot Less Plastic Than We Thought–and That’s a Bad Thing.”

James West, “What You Need to Know About the Coming Jellyfish Apocalypse.”

Brad Plumer, “Oklahoma’s Earthquake Epidemic Linked to Wastewater Disposal.”

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End of the Semester Links Spring 2014

It’s been a busy end of the semester and I haven’t been able to post anything for a bit. So, now that I have a bit of time before the semester wraps up, here’s a bunch of stuff that has been happening the last few weeks. My apologies if I’m a bit late on some of these things.

Nuclear and Disaster

Laura Miller reviews Craig Nelson’s The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and the Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Age.

John Metcalfe, “What Famous Old Paintings Can Tell Us About Climate Change.”

Only .02% of published research rejects global warming.

Adam Weinstein, “Arrest Climate Change Deniers.”

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Nuclear Football

Greg Mitchell at The Nation reports on a (really a fairly bizarre) football game played in the ruins of Nagasaki on 1 January 1946, in “Football at Ground Zero: The Atom Bomb, Nagasaki, New Year’s Day, 1946”:

One of the most bizarre episodes in the entire occupation of Japan took [. . .] on January 1, 1946, in Nagasaki.

Back in the States, the Rose Bowl and other major college football bowl games, with the Great War over, were played as usual on New Year’s Day. To mark the day in Japan, and raise morale (at least for the Americans), two Marine divisions faced off in the so-called Atom Bowl, played on a killing field in Nagasaki that had been cleared of debris. It had been “carved out of dust and rubble,” as one wire service report put it.

(This really sounds like something straight outta Don DeLillo‘s End Zone [1972]).

Also, as Stuart Isett’s photography website points out, the Richland High School football team,

[i]n the fall of 1945, after an atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki [. . .] changed the team’s mascot to a mushroom cloud and called themselves the “Bombers.” The plutonium that was in that bomb was manufactured by workers at nearby Hanford Nuclear Site as part of the Manhattan Project. [. . .] During the Cold War, the Hanford project was expanded to include nine nuclear reactors and five massive plutonium processing complexes, which produced plutonium for most of the 60,000 weapons in the U.S. nuclear arsenal. The weapons production reactors were decommissioned at the end of the Cold War, but the manufacturing process left behind 53 million U.S. gallons of high-level radioactive waste that remains at the site. Hanford is the most contaminated nuclear site in the United States and is the focus of the nation’s largest environmental cleanup, providing thousands of jobs to residents in nearby towns such as Richland.

Check out some of the photos.

And, because we’re on the subject of “nuclear football,” I thought I’d include an image of the actual nuclear football: the satchel/black box/briefcase carried around near the President of the United States, the contents of which are capable of launching a nuclear attack.

Happy New Year!