More Doomy Doom and Less Doomy Doom

More Doomy

Brad Plummer has an interview with author of The Sixth Extinction Event, Elizabeth Kolbert (who was also on The Daily Show the  other night) at The Washington Post.

“The NSA and Climate Change: What We Know So Far,” by Joshua Eaton.

“How Iowa Flattened Literature,” or rather, the CIA and the Writer’s Workshop.

NASA is going to turn the moon into computronium, ur, I mean give licenses to mine it.

Less Doomy

David Foster Wallace’s letter to his editor.

Dragonlance should be the next fantasy movie franchise. I agree, esp. if it means they make the Legends series into films.

A new anthology of post-apocalyptic fiction, Wastelands 2, edited by John Joseph Adams.

A pretty scathing review of Matthew Barney’s River of Fundament (2014) that actually makes me want to see it more.

And a book I had an essay appear in last year, The Silence of Fallout: Nuclear Criticism in a Post-Cold War World, was just selected as one of Zer0 Books‘ best books of 2013.

End of the Year Links

As I have been lax in posting things, yesterday I posted a bunch of links on recent stories regarding the NSA. Today I’m posting links of more general interest. I’ve tried to organize them by category.

 

Iran

The biggest story I have not had time to address were the diplomatic talks regarding Iran’s nuclear program. So here are some links to that.

On 5 November 2013 Reuters reported that Iran, Israel, and Middle East countries “took part in a meeting two weeks ago about prospects for an international conference on banning nuclear weapons in the Middle East.”

Temporary nuclear pact.

UN nuclear inspectors in Iran.

“Iran, from Enemy to Ally.”

Right on the verge of a nuclear agreement, perhaps the biggest event in nuclear nonproliferation in my lifetime, Bob Mendez fights Obama on imposing new sanctions on Iran, as do fifteen other democrats. More here.

Though from today: progress in nuclear talks.

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“Apocalypse Networks: Representing the Nuclear Archive” in The Silence of Fallout: Nuclear Criticism in a Post-Cold War World

Silence of Fallout Cover

Michael J. Blouin, Morgan Shipley, and Jack Taylor have edited a great collection of essays on nuclear criticism, The Silence of Fallout: Nuclear Criticism in a Post-Cold War World (this links to the publisher page). I have an essay in the collection, “Apocalypse Networks: Representing the Nuclear Archive,” that any reader of this blog would probably find quite interesting. And of course there are a number of other interesting essays by accomplished scholars and nuclear critics. You can preview the table of contents, the preface, and the introduction here. And the book is now readily available for order from Amazon and of course other places. (Probably the quickest way to get it would be going directly to CSP’s site.)

I’ve included the Table of Contents below:

Preface, John Canaday

Introduction: The Silence of Fallout, Michael J. Blouin, Morgan Shipley, and Jack Taylor

Chapter One: “What Works”: Instrumentalism, Ideology, and Nostalgia in a Post-Cold War Culture, Jeff Smith

Chapter Two: Specters of Totality: The Afterlife of the Nuclear Age, Aaron Rosenberg

Chapter Three: Queer Temporalities of the Nuclear Condition, Paul K. Saint-Amour

Chapter Four: Apocalypse Networks: Representing the Nuclear Archive, Bradley J. Fest

Chapter Five: Cut to Black: Nuclear Criticism in a Post-September 11th America, Joseph Dewey

Chapter Six: The Pixilated Apocalypse: Video Games and Nuclear Fears, 1980-2012, William Knoblauch

Chapter Seven: Depictions of Destruction: Post-Cold War Literary Representations of Storytelling and Survival in the Nuclear Era, Julie Williams

Chapter Eight: Allegories of Hiroshima: Toward a Rhetoric of Nuclear Modernism, Mark Pedretti

Chapter Nine: War as Peace: Afterlives of Nuclear War in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest, Jessica Hurley

Chapter Ten: The Hunger Games: Darwinism and Nuclear Apocalypse Narrative in the Post-9/11 World, Patrick B. Sharp

Chapter Eleven: Legacy of Waste: Nuclear Culture After the Cold War, Daniel Cordle

Chapter Twelve: In a dark wud: Metaphors, Narratives, and Nuclear Weapons, John Canaday

Forthcoming: The Silence of Fallout: Nuclear Criticism in a Post-Cold War World

I just sent along my corrected proofs for a chapter, titled “Apocalypse Networks: Representing the Nuclear Archive,” which will appear in The Silence of Fallout: Nuclear Criticism in a Post-Cold War World, to be published this spring by Cambridge Scholars Publishing, and edited by Michael J. Blouin, Morgan Shipley, and Jack Taylor. You can check out a description of the book here. And the book is available for pre-order on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and many other booksellers. I am quite excited for this collection, which will include contributions from a number of notable scholars and nuclear critics, including Paul K. Saint-Amour, Daniel Cordle, and John Canaday.