End of Semester Links, Spring 2015

I’m looking forward to a lot of exciting projects this summer, including some reviews, an interview, essays, and finishing the book. Like years past, I’ll be spending most of my days in front of the computer, I imagine, so you can expect many more links in the months to come. To start off:

 

Nuclear

Who knew there was such a thing?: The National Atomic Testing Museum.

 

Hyperarchival

“How the KGB Archives Will Be Opened and Information Declassified.”

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End of the Semester Links, Fall 2014

I have been understandably busy with the end of a fun and challenging semester. So there are quite a few links that have built up.

 

Nuclear and Environment

William J. Broad and David E. Sanger, “US Ramping Up Major Renewal in Nuclear Arms.”

Robert Burns, “Air Force: Hagel Departure Won’t Slow Nuke Reforms.”

Mark Memmot, “Nun Who Broke Into Nuclear Complex Gets 35-Month Jail Term.”

Barbara Starr, “Navy Investigation Under Way after Female Officers Filmed.”

Eric Holthaus, “Seventy–Seven Zero–Inches of Snow for Buffalo as Winter Overpowers America.”

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Daylight Savings Time Links

The extra hour today means I have time to post some links. There are many, as it’s been a while.

 

Nuclear and Environment

“Lockheed Announces Breakthrough on Nuclear Fusion Energy.”

Matthew L. Wald, “Calls to Use Yucca Mountain as a Nuclear Waste Site, Now Deemed Safe.”

Rizwan Asghar, “Illicit Nuclear Trafficking.”

“Emergency Agencies Practice Response to Nuclear Explosion in Times Square.” (Didn’t DeLillo have something to say about this kind of thing . . . ?)

Jonathan Tirone, “U.S. Said to Join Russia in Blocking Nuclear Safety Moves.”

“Notice to Congress: Continuation of the National Emergency on Russian Fissile Material.”

Darren Boyle, “Inside China’s Top Secret Nuclear Bunker: Cold War Relic Built into a Mountain to Fend off Soviet Attack Is Now a Tourist Attraction.” (Thanks to Terrence Ross for a lot of the above links.)

“Asgard’s Fire,” on thorium reactors.

Ari Phillips, “New Study Details Alarming Acceleration in Sea Rise.”

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The Flood This Time: Some 2012 Weather Links

2012, by all accounts, was the warmest year on record. Among many other responses to the disastrous 2012 (w/r/t weather) both The New Inquiry and Jacobin: A Magazine of Culture and Polemic have published some excellent pieces on climate change, disaster, and our contemporary sense of an ending. Among them are Alyssa Battistoni’s excellent, “The Flood Next Time: Life After Emergency” at Jacobin. The New Inquiry has devoted an entire issue to weather , including a nice editorial, and an essay from the incomparable Gerry Canavan, “Après Nous, le Déluge.”  (This is all also coming in the wake of this nonsense.) These magazines, along w/ my good friend Alexander Provan’s Triple Canopy, also just had a very nice writeup in The Guardian. Enjoy.

Hyperarchival Leap-Day Eve Links

So, first my good friend Alexander Provan, editor of the excellent Triple Canopy, and accomplished writer in his own right (see him, for example, on our post-nuclear future and Yucca Mountain at The Believer), is interviewed in this fairly interesting article on the future of literacy, print culture, etc (“Post-Print: Digital Publishing Comes of Age”) written by Ian Erickson-Kery over at The Eye.

Uncylopedia: what happens when Wikipedia intentionally gets it wrong. I find this fascinating in the extreme, and pretty much what I (sometimes) mean by “hyperarchival.”

In commemoration of DFW’s 50th b-day, 46 things of his to look at on the internet.

Star Wars Uncut: mashing together homemade scenes of Star Wars into one, gigantic, hyperarchival gem.

(Since I’ve been playing quite a bit of Skyrim recently [and am actually currently planning on writing a bit for it here], “Fuck Forever, and Never Die.” Though I’m not sure really why sex is really part of this conversation, this is a fairly interesting article.)

And from io9: “Rock You Like an Apocalypse: Art that Destroys the World!” A whole smorgasbord of eschatological imagery. A couple examples: