Links in the Time of Coronavirus, Vol. 29: July 16–August 15, 2022

This is the last volume in my “Links in the Time of Coronavirus” series. This is for a few reasons. First and foremost, a new academic year is about to start, and I know I’m going to be busy (especially this coming semester), will again fall behind with posting regularly, and would like to return to putting up just four(ish) link posts per year (one each season: e.g., “Fall 2022 Links”). This will also allow me to be more selective and less encyclopedic in my links and to worry less about capturing the full “fabric” of events as I perceive them (from my obviously limited and privileged subject position). Second, as the CDC has just (quite controversially) considerably reduced COVID-19 guidelines—with the Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) Greta Massetti saying: “‘This guidance acknowledges that the pandemic is not over, but also helps us move to a point where COVID-19 no longer severely disrupts our daily lives,'” adding later that: ‘”We know that COVID 19 is here to stay,'”—it seems as good a point as ever, considering these links began on the occasion of an official body (the World Health Organization) declaring a global pandemic, to stop this series.

For no matter how much we may disagree with the CDC’s decision, Massetti’s latter point seems pretty clearly the case at this point, that COVID-19 is here to stay, and it is this point in particular that has made me to decide to cease grouping my links as part of the “time of coronavirus” series. It appears that there will never now not be a time of coronavirus; from here on out any links I post will always be “in the time of coronavirus.” (When I imagine keeping this series going until we might say it is “not” the time of coronavirus—such a prospect is dauntingly disheartening.) Let me be clear, however: my decision to discontinue this series has nothing to do with thinking that the pandemic is “over,” only that it appears to have made a shift to something that—woefully, unfortunately, perhaps criminally—is just part of the fabric of being human in the twenty-first century; it has become a fact of our lives no matter how much we wish it had all gone differently, wish that we lived in a world/country with a functioning healthcare system and a greater agreement about scientific facts, with a greater capacity to care for each other, to wear masks, to get vaccinated, etc. But we didn’t, we don’t. The current point the pandemic has reached, this point of ubiquity, of defeatism, of “normalization,” of the fact that COVID-19 rarely dominates headlines in this time of search warrants and climate bills, means that it is now time, at least for my practice of putting up links, to move them to another position, another standpoint. See you in “Fall 2022 Links.”


Nuclear and Environmental

Emily Cochrane, “Senate Passes Climate, Health and Tax Bill, with All Republicans Opposed.”

Jack Ewing and Ivan Penn, “Climate Bill ‘Transformative’ for Auto and Energy Industries.”

Kate Aronoff, “Congress Is about to Pass a Historic Climate Bill. So Why Are Oil Companies Pleased?”

Paul Krugman, “Did Democrats Just Save Civilization?”

Continue reading

Links in the Time of Coronavirus, Vol. 26: April 16–May 15, 2022

Politics and Economics

Josh Gerstein and Alexander Ward, “Supreme Court has Voted to Overturn Abortion Rights, Draft Opinion Shows.”

Roxane Gay, “It’s Time to Rage.”

Matt Gertz, “With Attack on Twitter, the Right Shows It Has Institutionalized Trump’s Corrupt Use of Government Power.”

Anthony Cuthbertson, “NFT Sales Plummet 92% as Market ‘Collapses.'”

David Yaffe-Bellany, Erin Griffith, and Ephrat Livni, “Cryptocurrencies Melt Down in a ‘Perfect Storm’ of Fear and Panic.”

Eric Budish, “The Economic Limits of Bitcoin and Blockchain.”

Nuclear and Environmental

Chris Cameron, “Climate Activist Dies after Setting Himself on Fire at Supreme Court.”

Abrahm Lustgartn, “The Great Climate Migration.”

Continue reading

Links in the Time of Coronavirus, Vol. 24: February 16–March 15, 2022

Ukraine (Ordered by Date of Appearance)

Alexander Gabuev, “On Why Vladimir Putin and His Entourage Want War.”

Edward Wong, Julian E. Barnes, and Anton Troianovski, “US Says Russia Has a List of Ukrainians to Kill or Detain after an Invasion.”

Anton Troianovski, “Moscow Orders Troops to Ukraine’s Separatist Regions after Putin Recognizes Their Independence.”

“Ukrainian Officials Report Missile Attacks in Kyiv.”

Mike McIntire and Michael Forsythe, “Putin Faces Sanctions, but His Assets Remain an Enigma.”

Peter Baker, “Biden and Putin, Children of the Cold War, Face Off in New Conflict.”

Emma Ashford, “It’s Official: The Post-Cold War Era Is Over.”

Manveen Rana, “Volodymyr Zelensky Survives Three Assassination Attempts in Days.”

Michael Schwirtz, Andrew E. Kramer and Michael Levenson, “Russian Forces Pound Civilians, as Putin Likens Sanctions to a ‘Declaration of War.'”

Michael D. Shear, “Biden Bans Oil Imports from Russia, Calling It a ‘Blow to Putin’s War Machine.'”


Nuclear and Environmental

James M. Acton, “The Most Immediate Nuclear Danger in Ukraine Isn’t Chernobyl.”

David E. Sanger and William J. Broad, “Putin Declares a Nuclear Alert, and Biden Seeks De-Escalation.”

Continue reading

Links in the Time of Coronavirus, Vol. 23: January 16–February 15, 2022

Screenshot (1)

Nuclear and Environmental

Henry Fountain, “An Extraordinary Iceberg Is Gone, but Not Forgotten.”

Jacob Blumenfeld, “Climate Barbarism: Adapting to a Wrong World.”

Joshua Rothman, “Can Science Fiction Wake Us Up to Our Climate Reality?”


Ukraine

The New York Times, “Moscow Is Pessimistic about Reaching Accord with US on Ukraine, but Talk Continues.”

Julian E. Barnes and Helene Cooper, “US Battles Putin by Disclosing His Next Possible Moves.”

And Max Fisher, “On Ukraine, US, and Russia Wage Signaling War to Avert Actual War.”


Coronavirus

Apoorva Mandavilli, “Yes, Omicron Is Loosening Its Hold. But the Pandemic Has Not Ended.”

Steven Kurutz, “Too Young to Feel So Old.”

Alexander Provan, “The Great Equalizer” (from June 2020).

Continue reading

Spring Semester 2022: Syllabi

Hartwick SpringThis spring semester at Hartwick College, I’m teaching two classes, ENGL 213 Introduction to Creative Writing, as usual, and a brand new course, ENGL 352 Critical Game Studies. I’m especially excited about the latter, as this was a course I developed at the University of Pittsburgh in AY 2015-16 with the aid of a course development grant but that I have not had a chance to teach until now.

The syllabi:

ENGL 213 Introduction to Creative Writing, Spring 2022

ENGL 352 Critical Game Studies, Spring 2022

Links in the Time of Coronavirus, Vol. 22: December 16, 2021–January 15, 2022

January 15, 2022

Nuclear and Environmental

Elizabeth Weil, “California’s Forever Fire.”

Bill McKibben, “The Year in Climate.”

Jeff Goodell, “‘The Fuse Has Been Blown,’ and the Doomsday Glacier Is Coming for Us All.”

John Levi Barnard, Stephanie Foote, Jessica Hurley, and Jeffrey Insko, eds. “Infrastructures of Emergency,” special issue, part 2, Resilience 8, no. 3 (Fall 2021).

Rebecca Evans, “Is Geoengineering the Only Solution?: Exploring Climate Crisis in Neal Stephenson’s Termination Shock.”

Jack Healy and Mike Baker, “As Miners Chase Clean-Energy Minerals, Tribes Fear a Repeat of the Past.”

Continue reading

Links in the Time of Coronavirus, Vol. 16: June 16–July 15, 2021

Heat Dome over Pacific Northwest, Summer 2021

Nuclear and Environmental

Kai Heron, “Extinction Isn’t the Worst That Can Happen.”

Christopher Flavelle and Kalen Goodluck, “Dispossessed, Again: Climate Change Hits Native Americans Especially Hard.”

Sarah Miller, “All the Right Words on Climate Have Already Been Said.”

Brad Plumer, Jack Healy, Winston Choi-Schagrin, and Henry Fountain, “Climate Change Batters the West before Summer Even Begins.”

Jeffrey Insko, “Line 5: Dismantling as World-Building” and “How to Dream beyond Oil.”

Jon Hay, review of Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex, by Jessica Hurley.

James Temple, “The Lurking Threat to Solar Power’s Growth.” Hmm.

Dan Egan, “The Climate Crisis Haunts Chicago’s Future: A Battle between a Great City and a Great Lake.”

Jacob Darwin Hamblin, The Wretched Atom: America’s Global Gamble with Peaceful Nuclear Technology.

Continue reading

Links in the Time of Coronavirus, Vol. 14: April 16–May 15, 2021

Politics and Economics

Declan Walsh, “Israel Ground Forces Shell Gaza as Fighting Intensifies.”

Committee to Protect Journalists, “Israeli Air Strikes Destroy Buildings Housing More than a Dozen Media Outlets in Gaza.”

Democracy Now!, “Gaza Journalist: Israel Is Deliberately Targeting the Media by Bombing AP and Al Jazeera Offices.”

Patrick Kingsley and Vivian Yee, “Conflict Spirals across Israel and the Palestinian Territories.”

Posted byMari Cohen, Joshua Leifer, and Alex Kane, “A Guide to the Current Crisis in Israel/Palestine.”

Samera Esmeir, “The Palestinians and the Struggle of the Dispossessed.”

Mariam Barghout, “Why Are Palestinians Protesting? Because We Want to Live.”

John Eligon, Tim Arango, Shaila Dewan, and Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, “Derek Chauvin Verdict Brings a Rare Rebuke of Police Misconduct.”

Tobi Haslett, “Magic Actions.”

Lili Hu, “Race, Policing, and the Limits of Social Science.”

Audra D. S. Burch, Amy Harmon, Sabrina Tavernise, and Emily Badger, “The Death of George Floyd Reignited a Movement. What Happens Now?”

Continue reading

Links in the Time of Coronavirus, Vol. 13: March 16–April 15, 2021

Map-of-Ships-Going-around-Cape-of-Good-Hope (1)

Nuclear and Environmental

Jessica Hurley and Dan Sinykin, “On the Ethics of Impossibility.”

Steven Watts, review of Infrastructures of Apocalypse, by Jessica Hurley.

Rebecca S. Oh, “Apocalyptic Realism: ‘A New Category of the Event.'”

Amy Brady, “Telling Tales of Climate Collapse: Novelists Weigh In.”

Patrick Kingsley, David E. Sanger, and Farnaz Fassihi, “After Nuclear Site Blackout, Thunder from Iran, and Silence from US.”

Continue reading