Hartwick College’s Faculty Lecture Series, Fall 2022

This fall, the Faculty Development Committee and the Office of Academic Affairs at Hartwick College will present three speakers in the annual Faculty Lecture Series.

All talks take place at during the common hour: 12:20–1:20 p.m. in Eaton Lounge, Bresee Hall at Hartwick College, Oneonta, New York.

Admission to the readings is free and the events are open to the public. Attendees and all campus visitors must be vaccinated for COVID-19 and will be required to provide either their vaccination card or the New York State Excelsior Pass. Any visitor requiring an exception to this requirement must complete this form and receive prior approval from the College.


Parker Troischt, “How Big Is Big? Using the Most Powerful Explosions in the Universe to
Improve Distance Determinations in Extragalactic Astronomy,” Friday, September 9, 2022.

Cheryl L. Johnson, “Third Culture and Identity: How Much Do I Need until I Am ‘Enough’?,” Friday, October 14, 2022.

Meghan Sheehy, “Investigating the Research-to-Practice Gap in Music Education: Results and Roadblocks,” Friday, November 11, 2022.

For more information, visit the Faculty Lecture Series webpage.

2022–25 Cora A. Babcock Chair in English at Hartwick College

I am thrilled and honored to announced that for the next three years (2022–25), I will be the Cora A. Babcock Chair in English at Hartwick College. This position will support continued work on my current scholarly book project, Too Big to Read: The Megatext in the Twenty-First Century, the publication of my just completed poetry manuscript, Postrock, and my next two books of poetry, 2018–202X: Sonnets and Synthwave.

For a glimpse into this work in progress, see my recent essay, “‘Is an Archive Enough?’: Megatextual Debris in the Work of Rachel Blau DuPlessis,” and some select poem(s) from Postrock and from 2018–202X: Sonnets.

Significant Others x Always Crashing: A Shadow Text Reading Series

On July 12, 2022 at 8:00 p.m. (EDT), as part of the Significant Others Reading Series—a “series dedicated to new books and the shadow texts that inspired them”—I’ll be giving an online reading of some of my sestinas from the latest issue of Always Crashing along with some of the poems in their background radiation. Mary Biddinger and Day Heisinger-Nixon will also be reading. Get the link to the reading here and order the issue here.

Links in the Time of Coronavirus, Vol. 26: April 16–May 15, 2022

Politics and Economics

Josh Gerstein and Alexander Ward, “Supreme Court has Voted to Overturn Abortion Rights, Draft Opinion Shows.”

Roxane Gay, “It’s Time to Rage.”

Matt Gertz, “With Attack on Twitter, the Right Shows It Has Institutionalized Trump’s Corrupt Use of Government Power.”

Anthony Cuthbertson, “NFT Sales Plummet 92% as Market ‘Collapses.'”

David Yaffe-Bellany, Erin Griffith, and Ephrat Livni, “Cryptocurrencies Melt Down in a ‘Perfect Storm’ of Fear and Panic.”

Eric Budish, “The Economic Limits of Bitcoin and Blockchain.”

Nuclear and Environmental

Chris Cameron, “Climate Activist Dies after Setting Himself on Fire at Supreme Court.”

Abrahm Lustgartn, “The Great Climate Migration.”

Continue reading

Links in the Time of Coronavirus, Vol. 25: March 16–April 15, 2022

Nuclear and Environmental

Max Fisher, “As Russia Digs In, What’s the Risk of Nuclear War? ‘It’s Not Zero.’”

William J. Broad, “How America Watches for a Nuclear Strike.”

Rod Buntzen, “This Is What It’s Like to Witness a Nuclear Explosion.”

Cara Buckley, “‘OK Doomer’ and the Climate Advocates Who Say It’s Not Too Late.”

Brad Plumer and Raymond Zhong, “Stopping Climate Change Is Doable, but Time Is Short, UN Panel Warns.”

John Vidal, “Energy Efficiency Guru Amory Lovins: ‘It’s the Largest, Cheapest, Safest, Cleanest Way to Address the Crisis.'”

Henry Fountain, “In a First, an Ice Shelf Collapses in East Antarctica.”


Ukraine

Jane Burbank, “The Grand Theory Driving Putin to War.”

Malachy Browne, David Botti, and Haley Willis, “Satellite Images Show Bodies Lay in Bucha for Weeks, Despite Russian Claims.”

“‘At Night I Dream of Mariupol’: Nine Accounts of Surviving a Russian Siege.” Continue reading

Links in the Time of Coronavirus, Vol. 24: February 16–March 15, 2022

Ukraine (Ordered by Date of Appearance)

Alexander Gabuev, “On Why Vladimir Putin and His Entourage Want War.”

Edward Wong, Julian E. Barnes, and Anton Troianovski, “US Says Russia Has a List of Ukrainians to Kill or Detain after an Invasion.”

Anton Troianovski, “Moscow Orders Troops to Ukraine’s Separatist Regions after Putin Recognizes Their Independence.”

“Ukrainian Officials Report Missile Attacks in Kyiv.”

Mike McIntire and Michael Forsythe, “Putin Faces Sanctions, but His Assets Remain an Enigma.”

Peter Baker, “Biden and Putin, Children of the Cold War, Face Off in New Conflict.”

Emma Ashford, “It’s Official: The Post-Cold War Era Is Over.”

Manveen Rana, “Volodymyr Zelensky Survives Three Assassination Attempts in Days.”

Michael Schwirtz, Andrew E. Kramer and Michael Levenson, “Russian Forces Pound Civilians, as Putin Likens Sanctions to a ‘Declaration of War.'”

Michael D. Shear, “Biden Bans Oil Imports from Russia, Calling It a ‘Blow to Putin’s War Machine.'”


Nuclear and Environmental

James M. Acton, “The Most Immediate Nuclear Danger in Ukraine Isn’t Chernobyl.”

David E. Sanger and William J. Broad, “Putin Declares a Nuclear Alert, and Biden Seeks De-Escalation.”

Continue reading

Links in the Time of Coronavirus, Vol. 23: January 16–February 15, 2022

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Nuclear and Environmental

Henry Fountain, “An Extraordinary Iceberg Is Gone, but Not Forgotten.”

Jacob Blumenfeld, “Climate Barbarism: Adapting to a Wrong World.”

Joshua Rothman, “Can Science Fiction Wake Us Up to Our Climate Reality?”


Ukraine

The New York Times, “Moscow Is Pessimistic about Reaching Accord with US on Ukraine, but Talk Continues.”

Julian E. Barnes and Helene Cooper, “US Battles Putin by Disclosing His Next Possible Moves.”

And Max Fisher, “On Ukraine, US, and Russia Wage Signaling War to Avert Actual War.”


Coronavirus

Apoorva Mandavilli, “Yes, Omicron Is Loosening Its Hold. But the Pandemic Has Not Ended.”

Steven Kurutz, “Too Young to Feel So Old.”

Alexander Provan, “The Great Equalizer” (from June 2020).

Continue reading